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[1] Sir John Kempt was a long-serving officer who was commissioned as an Ensign in 1783 in the 101st Foot, and was a Colonel by 1829. He fought in Egypt, Holland, Spain and at Waterloo, where he was wounded.

[2] All searches can either start using the Adobe Reader Search facility, or by using the index at the rear of the volume. Here we locate him in the Army List Index, showing multiple entries. The numbers are page numbers, which do not match the same page numbers on the Reader, but in the original list. However, it is easy to find them.

[3] Kempt's name first appears in the rank listings. By 1832 he was a Lieutenant General, one of the senior officers of the Army. His entry shows his basic details and indicates some of his campaign medals and current posting. The second column shows his date of commission as a Major General.

[5] While he had served with several Regiments, in 1832 he was on paper with the 40th Foot (2nd Somersets) as their Colonel, a position he had been in since 8 January 1829, according to the List.

[6] While he was the Colonel of the 40th Foot, he was in fact also commander of the Fort William Garrison in Scotland, as shown here. The amount shown is the pay he was on 'per diem' (per day) for this posting.

[4] Kempt's extensive military career had also taken him to North America (Canada) where much of the British Army had served after Waterloo. The information on this page shows the date he was commissioned as a Lieutenant General in America.

[5] While he had served with several Regiments, in 1832 he was on paper with the 40th Foot (2nd Somersets) as their Colonel, a position he had been in since 8 January 1829, according to the List.

[6] While he was the Colonel of the 40th Foot, he was in fact also commander of the Fort William Garrison in Scotland, as shown here. The amount shown is the pay he was on 'per diem' (per day) for this posting.

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[7] His other duties as a senior officer saw him in the post as Master General of the Ordnance, which put him as the most senior officer in the Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers. This information is confirmed on pages 307 and 327. Control of the ordnance meant he was responsible for supplying ammunition, equipment and special weaponry to these two important branches of the Army.

[8] Although not in the Index, page 90 shows his 'Honorary Distinctions'. These include the symbol denoting the Waterloo Medal, and the 'Cross' which was the Military General Service Medal with clasps for the various battles against Napoleon's armies he fought. This page also indicates his early service in the Peninsula War was as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Light Infantry and latterly with the 7th Hussars.

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[9] Armed with this 'snap shot' of Sir John Kempt's career as it was in 1832, the next step would be The National Archives. Medal Rolls in WO100 would confirm his entitlement, and a service record may exist in WO76, although this is rare for officers from this period. A leaflet on sources of officer biography can be downloaded from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ militaryhistory.

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