Glossary

Abstract A brief overview or summary of what a document or Web site contains. Adjutant General's report Published account of the actions of military units from a particular state during a war. adoption To legally be declared part of a family into which you were not born. Ahnentafel A well-known genealogical numbering system. Ahnentafel is a method of numbering that has a mathematical relationship between parents and children. The word itself means ancestor and table in German also referred to...

Accessing Australian Sources

When researching Australian ancestors, there are two distinct paths - aboriginal records and the sources for later settlers. For an introduction to aboriginal records, see Australian Aboriginal Genealogy Resources at mc2.vicnet. net.au home pmackett web index.html. The Australian Family History Compendium (www.cohsoft.com.au afhc ) offers information on a wider range of record types, as well as information on archives, maps, glossary, and societies. A transcription of the convicts on...

Genealogy Online

Helm and April Leigh Helm by Matthew L. Helm and April Leigh Helm Disclaimer This eBook does not include ancillary media that was packaged with the printed version of the book. Genealogy Online For Dummies , 5th Edition 111 River Street Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774 Copyright 2008 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana Published simultaneously in Canada No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a...

Family Search Family History Library Catalog

In Chapter 4, we highlight several features of the FamilySearch site. One that we don't talk about is the Family History Library Catalog. This catalog lists over 3 million microfilms microfiches and 300,000 books in the Family History Library collection. This is a good resource for finding family histories that are already completed on branches of your family. You can search the catalog by author, microfilm fiche, place, surname, keyword, title, subject, and call number.

Looking at general Internet metasearch engines

Wouldn't it be nice if we never had to visit multiple sites to search the Internet This burning question led directly to the creation of meta-search engines, which use a single interface (or form) to execute searches using several different search engines. They then return the results of all the individual search engines back to a single page that you can use to view the results. The number of results from meta-search engines can be overwhelming, so it's important for you to have a good search...

European Resources

If your ancestors came from Europe, you may want to consult information on one of the continent's many ethnic groups. Your level of genealogical success with European ethnic records depends greatly on the history of the group and the areas in which your ancestors lived. There may be fewer surviving records for ancestors from places that weathered several wars and border changes than for those who lived in a more stable environment. Here is a sampling of European ethnic-research sites 1 Austrian...

Hispanic Roots

A growing number of genealogists are researching their Hispanic roots. If you have Hispanic ancestors, you can use several different types of records to pursue your genealogy, depending on when your ancestor immigrated. If your ancestor immigrated in the nineteenth or twentieth century, look for vital records, military records, photographs, passports, church records, passenger lists, naturalization papers, diaries, or other items that can give you an idea of the birthplace of your ancestor. For...

About This Book

Researching your family history online is like being a child in a candy store. There are so many neat things that catch your eye that it's difficult to decide which one to try. That's where this book comes in. We try to help you become a discriminating candy eater well, a discriminating researcher, anyway by showing you not only the locations of useful genealogy sites but also how to effectively use them to meet your research goals. Having said that, you're probably asking yourself how this...

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Ophthalmology Exam Mbbs Funny

You should now see the source icon next to the field on the Family View. You may have already noticed that there's another way to get to the Edit Person box to add Sources. You can highlight the individual's name box on the Pedigree chart, and then select the Person Sources link from the drop-down menu that you access through the Sources icon on the toolbar. This enables you to add a source that is not necessarily tied to one specific event in that person's life. If your ancestor kept a diary...

Family associations and organizations

Family association sites are similar to one-name study sites in terms of content, but they usually have an organizational structure (such as a formal association, society, or club) backing them. The association may focus on the surname as a whole or just one branch of a family. The goals for the family association site may differ from those for a one-name study. The maintainers may be creating a family history in book form or a database of all individuals descended from a particular person....

Special ethnic pages about African ancestry

Many Web sites include information on a particular subset of individuals of African ancestry. Here are some you may want to visit i The African-Native Genealogy home page provides details on the Estelusti, a tribe of Black Indians in Oklahoma (www.african-native american.com). i You can find information on French Creoles on the French Creoles Free People of Color Web site (www.frenchcreoles.com Creole To find additional sites containing unique information about researching your African...

Fraternal Orders and Service Clubs

Were any of your ancestors members of fraternal orders or service clubs Many such organizations are out there, and chances are, you have at least one ancestor who was a member of an order or club. Although most of the more commonly known organizations are for men, affiliated organizations for women exist, too. Here are a few general information sites on fraternal orders and service clubs 1 Ancient and Mystical Order Rosae Crucis www.amorc.org 1 Ancient Order of Hibernians in America www.aoh.com...

Traversing the Emerald Isle

As we mentioned in the previous section, the GENUKI site (www.genuki. org.uk) contains information on a variety of geographic areas in the United Kingdom and Ireland. There are pages for all 32 counties of Ireland and you can find brief articles on a variety of topics including cemeteries, censuses, church records, civil registrations, court records, emigration and immigration, land and property, newspapers, probate records, and taxation. You can also find county pages at the Ireland Genealogy...

Aboutcom Genealogy One Stop Beginners Genealogy

If you are looking for information on a wide range of genealogical topics, hop on over to the About.com Genealogy site. The One-Stop Beginner's Genealogy section of the site has a large collection of articles that are categorized by subject Articles and Tips, Learning Corner, and Tools and How-To. There are many subcategories under each of these topics as well. Some of the resources within these categories include information on surname origins, mistakes you can avoid, a genealogy chat room,...

Your Ancestors Here There and Everywhere

Finding out where your ancestors lived Locating places on maps and in history Using maps in your research Getting information from local sources 5ay that while researching census records, you find that your great-great-great- grandfather lived in Winchester, Virginia. But where is Winchester What was the town like Where exactly did he live in the town What was life like when he lived there To answer these questions, you need to dig a little deeper than just retrieving documents you need to...

Transcribed records for Hispanic ancestors

Transcribed records are also available on sites that focus on Hispanic ancestors. For example, you can view transcribed records from the 1757, 1780, 1791, 1823, and 1860 censuses of the village of Guerrero in Mexico (along with baptismal records) at Other transcribed records are available online visit a comprehensive genealogical site if you're interested in discovering whether other sites pertain more specifically to your research. The Puerto Rican Hispanic Genealogic al Society home page. The...

Turning to Bible Records

Bible records are a great source of birth, death, and marriage information for time periods before vital records were required. As most of these are held by private individuals, it is sometimes very difficult to locate these records. Recognizing the importance of these records, groups have created Web sites to share the information contained within the Bibles. Here are a few sites worth visiting Figure 9-5 shows the results of our WorldCat search. 1 Ancestor Hunt Family Bible Records...

Swimming through Caribbean genealogy

To be successful in researching Caribbean genealogy, you have to be aware of the history of the particular island that you are researching. Some islands will have a variety of record sets that may differ significantly depending upon what country was in control of the island. A place to start your research is the CaribbeanGenWeb Project page at www. rootsweb.com caribgw . The project is an umbrella site for each of the individual islands that have their own project pages. The site contains a...

Autosomal DNA testing

Probably the most controversial of the DNA tests are autosomal tests (also known as admixture or bio-geographical tests). Earlier in the chapter, we mentioned that autosomal DNA consists of 22 pairs of non-sex chromosomes found in the cell nucleus. This DNA is found in both males and females and is the part of the DNA that is responsible for physical characteristics of an individual, like height and eye color. The DNA is inherited from both parents and all four grandparents. Autosomal testing...

Y chromosome DNA testing

In the previous section, we introduced the concept that the Y chromosome DNA test examines the Y chromosome that men receive from their male ancestors. The Y chromosome is part of the one chromosomal pair that is not common between males and females in males, the pair has an X and a Y chromosome, whereas in females, the pair has two X chromosomes. We also mentioned that this test is only available for men (although women can participate in Y chromosome projects by using a father, brother, or...

Photo Is Worth a Thousand Words

Haplogroup Famous People

In Chapter 2, we discuss the value of photographs in your genealogical research. But a lot of us don't have photographs of our family beyond two or three generations, though it sure would be great to find at least an electronic copy of a picture of your great-great-grandfathers. Actually, a picture of your great-great-grandfather may exist. Another researcher may have posted it on a personal site or the photograph may be part of a collection belonging to a certain organization. You may also be...

Positioning your family Using global positioning systems

After learning the location of the final resting place of great-great-great-grandpa Nimrod (yes, that is the name of one of April's ancestors), you just might get the notion to travel to the cemetery. Now, finding the cemetery on the map is one thing, but often finding the cemetery on the ground is a completely different thing. That is where global positioning systems come into play. A global positioning system (GPS) is a device that uses satellites to determine the exact location of the user....

Plotting against the family

While finding the location where your ancestors lived on a map is interesting, it is even more exciting to create your own maps that are specific to your family history. One way genealogists produce their own maps is by plotting land records They take the legal description of the land from a record and place it into land-plotting software, which then creates a map showing the land boundaries. A couple of programs for plotting boundaries are DeedMapper by Direct Line Software and Metes and...

Entering Information into Roots Magic

To help you get a better idea of how software can help you organize your records and research, and to help you figure out what features to look for in particular software packages, this section examines how to use RootsMagic, a popular genealogy software program. You can load a trial version of the RootsMagic software onto your computer from the CD-ROM accompanying this book. (For installation instructions, see the Appendix.) As you probably have already discovered, genealogy is full of...

Looking at directories and newspapers

If you have a general idea of where your family lived at a particular time, but no conclusive proof, city and county directories and newspapers from the area may help. (Census records, which we discuss in Chapters 2 and 5, are quite helpful for this purpose, too.) Directories and newspapers can help you confirm whether your ancestors indeed lived in a particular area and, in some cases, they can provide even more information than you expect. A friend of ours has a great story morbid as it is...

Where to begin searching for genealogical information on Hispanic ancestors

If you aren't sure where to begin your research, check out the messages that people post to the GEN-HISPANIC-L mailing list at lists.rootsweb.com index intl ESP GEN-HISPANIC.html. If your genealogical interests lie in a specific country or ethnic subgroup, you may want to join one of the following mailing lists 1 Basque-L This list discusses Basque culture and periodically includes genealogical postings. To subscribe to the mailing list, type SUBSCRIBE BASQUE-L your first name your last name in...

Introducing the Helm Online Family Tree Research Cycle

No book on research would be complete without some sort of model to follow, so we created one just for you. Of course, wanting to take credit for our fabulous model, we like to call it the Helm Online Family Tree Research Cycle. Sounds impressive, doesn't it Well, we have to admit that most of it is common sense. Figure 1-1 shows the five phases of the cycle planning, collecting, researching, consolidating, and distilling. Sticking with the family tree motif here, we liken the cycle to the...

Surveying Land Lovers

Land records are among the most plentiful sources of information on your ancestors. Although a census would have occurred only once every ten years, land transactions may have taken place two or three times a year, depending on how much land your ancestor possessed. These records don't always contain a great deal of demographic information, but they do place your ancestor in a time and location, and sometimes in a historical context as well. For example, you may discover that your ancestors...

Exploring south of the border Mexican sources

To get your feet wet with resources from Mexico, take a look at the Mexico Research Outline at the FamilySearch site (www.familysearch.org xico.ASP). The outline covers archives and libraries, cemeteries, church records, emigration and immigration, gazetteers, land and property, military records, probate records, and societies. You can find a primer on tracing your ancestors on the Mexico Genealogy 101 page at the About.com genealogy site The MexicoGenWeb site (www.rootsweb.com mexwgw )...

Religious Group Records

In the past, several countries required attendance at church services or the payment of taxes to an ecclesiastical authority. Although your ancestors may not have appreciated those laws at the time, the records that were kept to ensure their compliance can benefit you as a genealogist. In fact, before governments started recording births, marriages, and deaths, churches kept the official records of these events. For those places where no such laws were in effect, you can use a variety of...

Scanning Scandinavian countries

It is a good idea to get an overview of genealogical record sets in Scandinavian countries. The Beginner's Guide to Finnish Family History Research members. aol.com dssaari guide.htm covers how to use parish, birth, marriage, death records, and communion books. MyDanishRoots.com mydanish roots.com contains articles on vital records, census lists, place names, emigration, and Danish History. The Federation of Swedish Genealogical Societies Sveriges Slaktforskarforbund hosts the site Finding Your...

Using American Soundex to search United States census records

For the censuses conducted from 1880 to 1920, you can use microfilmed indices organized under the American Soundex system. a amp V IUHq The American Soundex system is a method of indexing that groups together s names that are pronounced in a similar way but are spelled differently. This indexing procedure allows you to find ancestors who may have changed the spelling of their names over the years. For example, you find names like Helm, Helme, Holm, and Holme grouped together in the American...

Focusing on genealogically focused search engines

Your first stop on a search for a particular ancestor should be a search engine that's intended just for that purpose. Genealogically focused search engines are sites that dispatch robots that index the full text of only those sites that contain information of interest to genealogists. By indexing only these types of sites, you receive fewer extraneous results when you type in your ancestor's name as a search term. An example of a genealogy focused search engine is TreEZy.com. The TreEZy.com...

Renta Researcher

There may come a time when you've exhausted all of the research avenues directly available to you and you need help that family, friends, and society members can't give you. Maybe all the records you need to get past a research brick wall are in a distant place, or maybe you have too many other obligations and not enough time to research personally. You needn't fret. Professional researchers are happy to help you. Professional researchers are people you pay a fee to dig around and find...

Marching to a Different Drummer Searching for Military Records

Although your ancestors may not have marched to a different drummer, at least one of them probably kept pace with a military beat at some point in life. Military records contain a variety of information. The major types of records that you're likely to find are service, pension, and bounty land records. Draft or conscription records may also surface in your exploration. Service records chronicle the military career of an individual. They often contain details about where your ancestors lived,...

Heading north for Canadian records

So you want to research your ancestors from Canada, eh Well, the first place to start is the Canadian Genealogy Centre www.collectionscanada.ca genealogy index-e.html maintained by Library and Archives Canada. The site contains information for beginners including what to do first, and search strategies for a variety of record types. Within the Guides section, see the online version of the Tracing Your Ancestors in Canada brochure www. 01-e.html if you are new to Canadian resources. Also, at the...

Haplogroups

Dna Haplogroup

We mentioned earlier in this chapter that haplotypes are a set of results of markers for a particular individual. When several similar haplotypes are categorized together, they compose a haplogroup. Haplogroups are useful for deep ancestry research that is, research that is further back than the advent of surnames and for placing a geographical context around the possible origin of the individuals within the haplogroup. Y chromosome haplogroups are categorized by the letters A through R by the...

Alexandria Digital Library Gazetteer Server

Looking for a particular place in the world Trying to figure out just where Metropolis, Illinois is so you can scan for the names of neighboring towns to look for ancestors The Alexandria Digital Library Gazetteer contains over 4 million features throughout the world. You can search by place name and define what feature type that you're looking for buildings, cities, drainage basins, landmarks, parks, and rivers, for example . You can also limit the area searched by clicking a map to define the...

Generating Gedcom files

Most genealogical databases subscribe to a common standard for exporting their information called Genealogical Data Communication, or GEDCOM. Beware that some genealogical databases deviate from the standard a little making things somewhat confusing. A GEDCOM file is a text file that contains your genealogical information with a set of tags that tells the genealogical database importing the information where to place it within its structure. For a little history and more information about...

Get Organized

The better organized you are, the more success you're likely to have with your research efforts. If you know ahead of time where you stand in researching your family lines, you can identify rather quickly which records or other materials you need to find about a particular surname, location, or time frame. Knowing your gaps in information enables you to get right down to the nitty-gritty of researching instead of spending the first hour or two of your research rehashing where you left off last...

Helping Others Is Its Own Reward

Don't go overboard patting your own back you know, promoting your home page or blog for the sake of receiving awards from other sites, magazines, societies, or other sources. Post your genealogical site or blog with the intent of helping other genealogists and encouraging a sharing genealogical community. If you use the majority of your page to advertise your awards and beg people to vote for your site in popularity contests, you lose a lot of valuable space where you can post information...

Creating a biographical brag book

You already know more about yourself than anyone else knows about you. Regardless of what your spouse thinks he knows, we are convinced that you're really the expert on you. You probably know your birth date, place of birth, parents' names, and where you've lived. We recognize that not everyone knows all this information adoptions or other extenuating circumstances may require you to do the best you can with what you know until you can discover additional information about yourself. So, sit...

American Indian Resources

Tracing your American Indian heritage can be challenging. Your ancestor may have moved frequently and, most likely, few written records were kept. However, your task isn't impossible. With a good research strategy, you may be able to narrow down your search area and find primary resources to unlock some of the mysteries of your ancestors. One key to your research is old family stories that have been passed down from generation to generation. Interviewing your family members is a good way to...

Click the link of any result to see more information

The second record is an Emanuel Helm born about 1863 in Fayette, Illinois. Looking for other records from Illinois, we find Manuel Helm in the 1870 U.S. Census and an Emanuel Helm born about 1863 in Fayette, Illinois, in the International Genealogical Index. As it turns out, all of these are the same person in the 1870 Census, his name was misspelled as Manuel. The results of a search for Emanuel Helm at Family Search.org. The results of a search for Emanuel Helm...

Researching Through the brick wall and beyond

Of course, researching your family history online is the topic of this entire book, so you can find the necessary resources to do a great deal of your online research in these pages. A time will undoubtedly come when you run into what genealogists affectionately call the Brick Wall Syndrome when you think you have exhausted every possible way of finding an ancestor. The most important thing you can do is to keep the faith don't give up Web sites are known to change frequently especially as more...

Assigning unique numbers to family members

If you have ancestors who share the same name, or if you've collected a lot of information on several generations of ancestors, you may have trouble distinguishing one person from another. For example, Matthew has an ancestor Samuel Abell, who had a son and two grandsons also named Samuel Abell. To avoid confusion and the problems that can arise from it, you may want to use a commonly accepted numbering system to keep everyone straight. Now genealogical numbering systems can be a bit confusing...

Finding land records in the United States

Your ancestors may have received land in the early United States in several different ways. Knowing more about the ways in which people acquired land historically can aid you in your research. Your ancestor may have purchased land or received a grant of land in the public domain often called bounty lands in exchange for military service or some other service for the country. Either way, the process probably started when your ancestor petitioned or submitted an application for the land. Your...

Scanners

Scanners remain one of the most popular computer peripherals for genealogists. Everyone wants to include some family photos with their genealogy or preserve precious documents electronically. With the cost of scanners decreasing and the availability of bundled software that allows you to use a scanner not only as a scanner, but also as a fax machine and copier adding a scanner to your equipment collection makes a lot of sense. It can make your genealogical research more colorful and more...

Understanding genealogical charts and forms

By the time that you have information on a few hundred people, it will become nearly impossible to keep all of those ancestors straight. To make life simple, family historians use charts and forms to organize research and make findings easier to understand and share. Some examples include Pedigree charts that show the relationships between family members, Descendant charts that list every person who descends from a particular ancestor, and census forms in which you can record information...

Helm S Family Research Page

Helm is the Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for FamilyToolbox.net, Inc. He's the creator and maintainer of the award-winning Helm's Genealogy Toolbox, Helm Helms Family Research Page, and a variety of other Web sites. Matthew speaks at national genealogical conventions and lectures to genealogical and historical societies. Matthew holds an A.B. in History and an M.S. in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. April...

Trial and Error at the Courthouse

Do you have an ancestor who was on the wrong side of the law If so, you may find some colorful information at the courthouse in the civil and criminal court records. Even if you don't have an ancestor with a law-breaking past, you can find valuable genealogical records at your local courthouse. Typical records you can find there include land deeds, birth and death certificates, divorce decrees, wills and probate records, tax records, and some military records provided the ancestors who were...

Searching census records from other countries

The United States isn't the only country that has collected information on its population. Census counts have taken place in several countries throughout history. Here are examples of a few countries with census records. Although Australia has taken a census every ten years since 1901, the first Australia-wide census was conducted in 1911. Now for some bad news every return has been destroyed, in accordance with law. There are other records that you can substitute for census returns in the form...

Collecting useful information

After you generate a research plan see the preceding section, Planning your research, for more information , you may need to fill in a few details like dates and locations of births, marriages, and deaths. You can collect this information by interviewing family members and by looking through family documents and photographs. See Chapter 2 for tips on interviewing and using family documents and photographs. You may also need to look up a few things in an atlas or gazetteer a geographical...

Icons Used in This Book

To help you get the most out of this book, we created some icons that tell you at a glance if a section or paragraph has important information of a particular kind. Here we refer you to other books or materials if you'd like additional information. fit U i q Here you can find concepts or terms that are unique to genealogy. When you see this icon, you know we're offering advice or shortcuts to make your researching easier. This icon points out software that's included on the CD-ROM. We walk...